Articles

Articles (279)

Sunday, 24 June 2018 20:26

Earth Day

Written by

From the Global Catholic Climate Movement

Earth Day is Sunday, April 22. 
We’re raising a united Catholic voice to make the most of this moment. The Global Catholic Climate Movement (GCCM) is creating a complete resource kit for Earth Day to help your community celebrate, advocate, and educate for creation. The kit ncludes:

  • Materials for a Creation mass, including homily helps and youth lesson plans
  • Materials for an after-mass event to learn why clean energy matters
  • Materials to advocate for your parish or diocese to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to protect vulnerable people from climate change.

Register now (http://catholicclimatemovement.global/earth-day-2018/) to receive GCCM Earth Day updates, first-look materials, and more.

 

Sunday, 24 June 2018 20:24

Pope Francis on Climate Change

Written by

Marie Venner – Denver

Last November Pope Francis pointed out four perverse attitudes to avoid. First denial and indifference, but also resignation—that temptation to decide some of what is needed is impractical or not possible—and trust in inadequate solutions!

Laudato Si 165 says we must shift off of fossil fuels without delay, in our electricity/utilities and transportation. Now it’s time for moral action inspired by Pope Francis, Maryknollers, and the Global Catholic Climate Movement. Come Holy Spirit!

Sunday, 24 June 2018 20:18

Beyond the Jubilee

Written by

Bill Murphy – Board Member, Boston Chapter

Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?” Mary Oliver

My wife, Jane, and I joined 21 Maryknoll jubilarians, who were marking 65th, 60th, 50th, or 40th anniversaries of ordination last June. The two-day celebration involved small gatherings of families and friends, as well as a huge and colorful liturgy in the chapel. Representatives of the four Maryknoll expressions—the Society, Congregation, Lay Missioners, and Affiliates—attended, and the chapel’s walls and windows reverberated with the sounds of brass horns, basses, and drums in full accompaniment.

After filling up on the spirit in the liturgy, we feasted on that special Maryknoll hospitality, a picnic with no end to the variety and quantity of food. People may not live by bread alone, but food is a good place to start.

Sunday, 24 June 2018 19:59

Easy Meeting: The Power of Questions

Written by

Ask and you shall receive.

Preparation

1. Read through this whole Easy Meeting. If your chapter is exploring a particular issue or concept, you could substitute your own issue.

2. Plan to have a practice run at the beginning of your meeting, asking questions on a general interest concept or issue.

3. Decide who will read the prayers and who will lead the discussions.

4. Have available some large pieces of paper and markers to record the group’s questions, and paper and pens for individual use.

5. If you wish, you may download a pdf of the print version of this meeting plan at: 

Meeting Plan

Opening Prayer:

Ask and it will be given you; search and you will find; knock and the door will be opened for you. For everyone who asks, receives, and everyone who searched finds, and for everyone who knocks, the door will be opened. Matthew 7:7-8

Reading:

This Easy Meeting will use questions to help your chapter explore and unpack two issues or concepts. First practice the questioning process.

Roseyn Devlin – Hawaii Chapter and Mary Ryan-Hotchkiss – Portland Chapter

Hawaiian Maryknoll Affiliate Patti Shannon emphasized: “We need to be bringing more young folks into our Maryknoll Affiliate Movement. They are our future.” Others added that the Affiliates need to reconnect the students of the Maryknoll School in Honolulu to their Maryknoll roots.

Hawaiian Maryknoll Affiliate Roseyn Devlin showed visitors Mary Ryan-Hotchkiss and Manny Hotchkiss the Maryknoll School in Honolulu, Hawaii, where she served as librarian for 22 years before retiring. Maryknoll School graduate Yvonne Morris was happy to talk about the school. Yvonne, who works with the Maryknoll Foundation which supports the Maryknoll School, emphasized that the school is “a loving place.  That’s what the Maryknoll Sisters taught us.”  The school’s motto is Noblesse Oblige: To whom much is given, much is expected.  Yvonne said the Maryknoll Sisters taught them this responsibility by their example: after teaching all day, the sisters went out to help others.

Sunday, 24 June 2018 16:36

Who is the Stranger?

Written by

Mef Ford – Boston Chapter

Hitchhiking across the country in his twenties, Sebastian Unger, author of Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging, carried a tent, sleeping bag, cookpots and stove, and a week’s worth of food. As he waited on the highway, a dirty, wild-haired man walked up the ramp and studied him. “Where you headed?” he asked. “California.” “How much food you got?” Nervous and afraid of being robbed, Unger lied. “Oh, I just got a little cheese.” The man shook his head and said, “You need more than that to get to California.”

He said he lived in a broken-down car and every morning walked three miles to a coal mine to see if they needed fill-in work. This was one of the many days that they didn’t. “So, I won’t be needing this,” he said, opening his lunch box. “I saw you from town and just wanted to make sure you were okay.” With that he gave him a bologna sandwich, apple, and bag of chips, probably from a local church.

What kept Unger thinking about this all his life was not that the man had been generous; many people are. But that this fellow had walked half a mile out of his way to make sure he was okay. He had treated the hitchhiking stranger like a member of his tribe.

Sunday, 24 June 2018 16:32

ICE Harasses a Permanent Resident

Written by

Mary Ryan-Hotchkiss – Portland Chapter

William Gonzalez thanks ACLU volunteer legal observer Cecile Baril (seated) and Manny Hotchkiss for coming to his hearing.

A minor victory cheered the more than 30 supporters attending William Gonzalez’s hearing at the Portland Courthouse this January. Some feared that the president’s removal of Temporary Protected Status for Salvadorans who came to the US decades ago might already be impacting people in our community.

William, a permanent resident, came to the US 38 years ago as a 12-year-old, with his mother who was granted asylum because of threats against her life in El Salvador. He has been harassed by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) since he applied for citizenship. In 2017, ICE required him to wear an ankle bracelet though he has not been a flight or security risk and has only had one DUI infraction since about 2001. William has worked 10-12 years as a cook at the famous Benson Hotel and has been involved in the union. He says the bracelet has to be recharged about every 8 hours, making it hard to get a full night’s sleep. Sometimes ICE can’t detect its signal from the basement kitchen where he works. When ICE can’t detect it, they can come to his house to question him.

William and his lawyers said the support of 40 letters and over 30 people at the hearing positively influenced the judge who ruled that the bracelet was to be removed and the harassing visits to William’s home to stop. William still had to pay a bond and further hearings will determine his immigration status.

People at the hearing were from The Immigrant Support Network, Interfaith Movement for Immigrant Justice (IMIrJ), ACLU, Havra Shalom Jewish congregation, Quakers, the Benson Hotel, and Unitarian and other churches. A representative from IMIrJ said it’s gratifying to see so many people at the hearing, but what is really needed is passage of compassionate Immigration Reform and the Real Dream Act.

 

Saturday, 23 June 2018 22:30

Buen Vivir: Living in Harmony

Written by

Kitty Schiltz – Seattle Chapter

Kitty sent her reflection as she and Roger were preparing to leave for Africa to attend the graduation of one of the children they have been helping with school since they were Maryknoll Lay Missioners in Tanzania.

Harmony seems like a stretch in these days of super egos and partisanship, but I saw it develop and flourish over the four days of the MAC 2017 in Guatemala. The deepest feeling I have about the conference is oneness. It wasn’t an invasion of North Americans telling Central Americans; it was complete sharing. The celebration of Mayan spirituality brought us together as a sharing in the cosmos. We arrived as individuals and left as one.

All the ceremonies/liturgies, group work and celebrations brought us together. Language was not a problem—there were words spoken in Spanish translated into English and English into Spanish but no need to translate the smiles and good will of all. Singing, dancing, walking, eating together blossomed into a unity of purpose and engendered a new Maryknoll Affiliate essence. At 25 years, we are still beginning.

 

Saturday, 23 June 2018 20:49

MAC 2017 Guatemala

Written by

We will aspire to “be of one heart”
...to be at peace, in harmony and in balance
with ourselves, with others, with Mother Earth, and with the Cosmos.


We celebrated
the oneness of all Maryknoll:
Lay Missioners, Fathers & Brothers, Sisters, and Affiliates.

Noted Mayan spiritual guide Daniel Caño led us in the Mayan Ceremony in Thanksgiving to the Grandmothers and Grandfathers.

At MAC 2017, 120 Maryknollers came together to reflect, analyze, and dream about the present moment and the future for Affiliates, for all of Maryknoll. Read the results (in Spanish or English) at http://afiliadosmaryknoll.wixsite.com/guate/post-mac-2017.

Rosa Beatriz Castaneda, left, and two committee members finalize details of Opening Ceremony as Fr. Bill Mullen and Affiliate Steve Barrett prepare to pray and translate for the gathering crowd of Affiliates.
Maryknoll and gifts from Affiliate regions. Behind are the organizing committee. Third from left, coordinator Rosa Beatriz and Executive Coordinator Bob Short, who assisted from the US, listen as Board chair David Schaffner says thanks. Steve Barrett, far right, translates.
Saturday, 23 June 2018 20:30

Serving the “Other” in Coatepeque

Written by

Patty Hinton – Midwest Regional Coordinator, St. Louis Chapter

I had the good fortune to travel with three other Affiliates—Susan Porrovecchio, Jim Comes, and Gerry Mullaney—on our post-MAC tour to the Coatepeque region of Guatemala.

James Comes, in the rear, looks on as Sr. Dee smith works with one of the patients, who had recently been wheel-chair bound and, through PT at the center, is gaining the strength to walk.

First, we spent time with Sister-Doctor Dee Smith, MM, and saw her tremendous accomplishments—finding and treating those diagnosed with HIV in and around Coatepeque. Most of those infected live in extreme poverty and also must deal with the stigma of this disease and rejection by their families. With a caring and dedicated staff, Sr. Dee has developed an outreach program to educate not only those in schools, but also families dealing with an infected family member.

Sr. Dee began the Santa Maria center in 2004, where attention is given to improving not only physical but also emotional care. They provide counseling, spiritual support, nutrition education, and physiotherapy as those inected continue their anti-retroviral treatment. Part of their holistic approach is to encourage the families to establish gardens with vegetables and healing herbs, as nutrition is key to strengthening immune systems. The center needs two new exercise bikes to help counter the various degrees of paralysis the disease can cause.

Sr. Jane and Sr. Mary Lou visit with health promoters at their clinic.
Sr.Dee supervises a health promoter tending a patient’s feet.

Then we were on our way to Catarina, San Marcos, to visit Sister-Doctors Jane Buellesbach and Mary Lou Daoust, MM, at their clinic where they see patients on Mondays. The rest of the week, they travel to 15 pueblos in rotation. They have a pharmacy and lab as well as a diabetic clinic which offers testing, treatment, and monitoring. While there, we also met a group of health promoters who were having a training session. They are educated by the sisters to diagnose through observation and treat common illnesses. They can dispense the basic medication the pharmacy provides.

Two of the health promoters at a rubber plantation clinic.

 

 

 

 

Several of the outlying clinics are associated with fincas (large farms), where the workers, usually with several children, live in substandard housing and work under deplorable conditions, making about $7/day. Despite working long hours, they volunteer their time to staff the clinics one day a week. The sisters also have a vented woodstove project, as well as a water filtration project, where the families pay half and the Maryknoll Sisters pay the other half of the cost of home water filters. These projects help alleviate a variety of lung and parasite problems.

As with all mission trips, I discovered the connections that exist between all of us, and that even though we are many, we are one!

Page 4 of 20