Not So Far Afield is a bimonthly publication of the Maryknoll Affiliates. The name is a play on the title of the original Maryknoll Magazine: The Field Afar.

You may subscribe to Not So Far Afield by email or to be notified when it is posted on our website.

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You may also download PDF versions of Not So Far Afield here.

Friday, 29 June 2018 04:50

#FamiliesBelongTogether Actions

Written by

Our Affiliate Global Vision helps us to see immigrants as brothers and sisters in need of our care and understanding. We are all members of families and cannot imagine the horror that families separated at the border are experiencing, the newest chapter in their migration tragedy.

The fate of Marco Antonio Munoz (find on https://www.washingtonpost.com), who was found dead in his cell after being forcibly separated from his 3 year old son at the US border tears at our hearts.

The Maryknoll Office of Global Concerns provides some concrete actions we can take. See Maryknollogc.org. We urge you to join the many organizations demonstrating in the streets, to advocate to the government officials for immediate compassionate immigration reform, to provide physical and emotional support to refugees in our communities, and to lift up our united voices in prayer in our churches for our detained sisters and brothers.

Friday, 29 June 2018 04:41

Continuing Buen Vivir

Written by

Kitty and Roger Schiltz – Seattle Chapter

This is an invitation to continue in the spirit of “Buen Vivir”. (We miss you. How are you doing?)  We can each share what we are doing personally globally, spiritually, and in action in this beautiful Maryknoll community. 

Our sharing: Maimuna is a lively young girl living at St. Agnes Chipole Children’s Home, Tanzania. We met her in 2012 when she was an infant brought to the orphanage because she wasn’t expected to live. Since then, when visiting the children, we have been charmed by Maimuna’s sense of fun and spirit. She is always at the center of activities playing with the other kids her age, peeling peanuts, and carrying wood, a smile always on her face. She is just beginning elementary school with life ahead of her.

Please add your stories by emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or posting them at https://www.facebook.com/maryknollaffiliates/.

Friday, 29 June 2018 04:31

The State of My Heart

Written by

Roxanne Hughes-Wheatland – Washington, DC Chapter

I attended the most recent Maryknoll Affiliate Board meeting at Maryknoll, NY, as a new board member. It was a wonderful opportunity to become acquainted with the other board members and see firsthand the level of dedication and hard work that is required to support the Affiliate members who carry out the Affiliate mission in their individual communities. Prior to arriving at the meeting, I certainly had many questions. What could I contribute to the board? Did I have enough experience as a Maryknoll Affiliate to be an asset and an effective board member? It is through this lens that I viewed my trip up to Maryknoll, NY, from just outside Baltimore, Maryland, on Thursday, April 19, 2018.

I arrived at Maryknoll on a cool and cloudy afternoon, and later that evening, after the other new board member—Rosa Beatriz Castañeda de Larios from Guatemala—and I received a warm welcome, the work of the board was underway. The meeting began with reflections from every board member regarding salient events and people who shaped their lives.

Friday, 29 June 2018 04:19

Amazing Affiliates

Written by

Dan Heuer – Westchester Chapter

Rudy Cypser, an extraordinarily gifted visionary and longtime Maryknoll Affiliate, passed on to New Life in February. He was 94 years old and is survived by Betty, his wife for seventy years. Together they led extraordinary lives of service to others. They were passionate in promoting restorative justice policies in many prison systems throughout the world, and they directly impacted the lives of many in prisons.

Rudy understood complex problems on many levels and then developed effective approaches to improve human service systems. He and Betty conducted bible study groups in prisons for 30 years and also conducted Alternatives to Violence training for inmates for many years. Rudy, working together with others, spread the Alternatives to Violence program to sixty countries in the world. He was deeply motivated by compassion for others and by his Christian faith in the goodness of the human person.

Rudy and Betty traveled to 26 countries in Asia and Europe and studied prison systems in Canada on a quest to learn about restorative justice programs in those countries. Then they took on an advisory role with a Committee of the Catholic Bishops of New York State and were effective in assisting the bishops in bringing about improvements in New York prisons.

Friday, 29 June 2018 04:11

Look for actions in your area!

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This year is the 50th Anniversary of the Campaign started by Martin Luther King, Jr. and thousands of Americans, alarmed at their government’s blindness to human need. As his Poor People marched, Dr. King paused to answer a plea for support from sanitation workers on strike in Memphis. There an assassin snatched his life on April 4th. Dr. King was assassinated before the March, but others took the lead. Now a new campaign continues his legacy.

The Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival

https://www.poorpeoplescampaign.org/

is uniting tens of thousands of people across the country to challenge the evils of systemic racism, poverty, the war economy, ecological devastation and the nation’s distorted morality.

Campaign Nonviolence, Sojourners Magazine, and Richard Rohr’s Center for Action and Contemplation have all endorsed and joined with it.

 

Friday, 29 June 2018 03:55

This Land is Your Land

Written by

Tom Hastings – Portland, OR

*Abridged from Tom Hastings’ post at HastingsNonviolence.blogspot.com/2017/10/this-land-is-your-land.htmlTom H. Hastings teaches Conflict Resolution at Portland State University and directs Oregon Peace Institute’s  program, PeaceVoice.

I traveled to North Dakota to join others in supporting a gentle man who tried to help everyone. For that, he was convicted of several crimes and will be heading to a North Dakota prison.

Michael Foster was born and raised in Texas, in an oil family. His crime in North Dakota was turning off the Keystone pipeline in a symbolic but real call to all of us to do what we can to stop global climate chaos.

That North Dakota valve turn was one of five similar actions last October—two women, three men, five valves on lines in Washington, Montana, North Dakota, and Minnesota, all done in resonance with the Break Free from Fossil Fuels campaign.

We see the consequences of paying no attention to our oil consumption: Harvey drowns Houston, fires rip through the West, every hurricane is more intense than it otherwise would be, droughts last longer, lakes are drying up, the seas are rising and surging, and, with fracking, even earthquakes are no longer a pure act of God. Most previously natural disasters are now unnatural disasters, made worse by our hand more than the hand of God or Mother Nature.

Friday, 29 June 2018 03:40

Active NE Ohio Chapter

Written by

Mary Ryan-Hotchkiss - NSFA Co-editor

Members of the NE Ohio chapter live near Cleveland and meet monthly in members’ homes. A couple members have retired, but most of them are still helping people on a daily basis in their professions as therapists, a nurse/yoga instructor, and a lawyer. They were quick to advocate for immigrants and refugees, gun control and concern about shootings, and the poor and hungry.

NE Ohio Chapter members meet with visiting Affiliates. Standing, l to r: Gerry Mullaney, Curt Alberti, Kathy Ress, Mike and Aileen McDonald; seated: Pam Cibik, and visitors Manny Hotchkiss and Mary Ryan-Hotchkiss.

Curt and Jan Alberti and Pam Cibik were in the recent massive March for Our Lives in Chicago. Pam insisted, “We’ve got to support the young people who are demanding safety and better gun control.”

Kathy Ress participated the Ecumenical Advocacy Day in Washington DC—co-sponsored by the Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns—that addressed both immigration and gun control. (Watch for her article, “Advocacy for Immigrants,” in the next issue.) She participates in a local group that succeeded after eight months and thousands of dollars in legal and other fees, in having one man released from ICE detention. Her parish is discerning being a sanctuary church.

Friday, 29 June 2018 03:28

Mission Nonviolence

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Moving our Broader Community to Nonviolence and Peace

Mini-Regional Conference

Portland, Oregon

Sept. 21-23, 2018

All Maryknoll Affiliates are invited!

Friday, 6PM – Affiliate Social and casual dinner

Saturday, 9-4 – Active Nonviolence Workshop

Sunday, 12:30PM – Affiliate gathering and lunch

For details, contact Mary at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

To  RSVP, use the downloadable form

Friday, 29 June 2018 03:16

Current Orbis Offerings

Written by

John Moritz – NE Florida Chapter

What do the Orbis authors offer to us Affiliates, both as individuals and as an expression of Maryknoll, lately? Here are four books that are very different, yet each makes a significant contribution to the discussion of issues and concerns facing the Affiliate world of today.

The Courage To Be Happy, by Pope Francis, is written for youth by an old man who hasn’t forgotten the best parts of being young. It is a spirituality of ascent for people in the first half of life. Pope Francis both understands and appreciates what the Gospel is calling youth to. Perhaps some of us who have moved into the second half of life have forgotten to hold onto that enthusiastic hope that once inspired us. This book will rekindle the fire of missionary zeal in all of us.

Choosing Peace, edited by Marie Dennis. It’s said that Maryknollers are better at declaiming than proclaiming. Choosing Peace looks at our prophetic voice of declaiming violence and proclaiming just peace. This assemblage of letters, essays, and reflections, written in conjunction with the April 2016 Conference on Nonviolence and Just Peace, proclaims the Gospel through many examples of positive, proactive voices for peace while declaiming a “fallen world” of war and systemic violence.

The Catholic Ethicist in the Local Church, edited by Antonio Autiero and Laurenti Magesa, explores the relationship of the local church with the universal church as a basis for understanding the complex and dynamic ecclesiology which Pope Francis is asking us to not only appreciate but live. The existential periphery, (read: The Field Afar, Not So Far Afield, mission, where you and I live) becomes the center point of our lived church experience. The notion of local magisterium rests on this understanding. In our complex world, culture, economics, and social structure all influence our moral decisions. It is not possible or effective to attempt to make anything more than broad statements at the universal level. So we are asked to reflect upon where lies the moral magesterium responsibility. The book presents local issues and questions from around the globe to illustrate this as a more mature approach to what it means to be church.

A side note: one interesting essay in this book deals with “digital localities.” With the growth of virtual communities and new ways of being Maryknoll Affiliates, what are the ethical questions surrounding the growth of the digital realities, electronic “places” with a sense of group identity. What are the components required for virtual communities to be real communities?

Cuentame: Narrative in the Ecclesial Present, by Natalia Imperatori Lee, is a “Latinx Church Experience for Gringos.” It introduced me to a whole vocabulary that I didn’t know that I need to know. This introduction to Latina/o church experience is written in English for an English-speaking audience. Imperatori Lee, of Cuban American heritage from Miami, uses narrative as a basis for her understanding of church. Our family story becomes the Story for us. Together our stories become the Story for the Church. And the Story is the truth, the Good News. Put in theological language, Sensus Fidelium is the basis of a narrative ecclesiology which the church has consistently taught to be infallible in its belief. Her narrative is an alternative story to the mainstream Catholic American story that has great truth and value. It places the sacredness of everyday life (lo cotidiano) as the source of holiness in the church. This storybook shares a vision that seems simple yet is profoundly perceptive. Imperatori Lee is a true teacher who puts rare understanding within the grasp of the many.

Affiliates receive 40% off at Orbisbooks.com.
Friday, 29 June 2018 03:12

North Carolina Chapter

Written by

Gloria Tan – Santa Maria Chapter, Wilmington

Santa Maria Chapter of Wilmingtron Affiliates, with Chapter Coordinator Gloria Tan, front row far left, and visitor Gail Kelley in front row, third from left.

The Affiliates of Santa Maria in Wilmington, NC, are currently involved in many activities. We prepare lunches for needy people who have no homes and we work together to help families in need by dispensing basic necessties. At the same time, we continue taking Communion to the Hispanics we find in the New Hanover Hospital. Here in Wilmington, we pray the rosary before Mass and attend the Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament once a month. Blessings from all of our Chapter.

Gail Kelley adds that she has been invited to attend all the Wilmington Chapter meetings and made it to a recent meeting. She explains that Gloria Tan was the Chapter Coordinator for many years and attended an Affiliate conference with her. Since Gail accompanied the Spanish-speaking Wilmington Chapter during their first orientation, Gloria asked her to give a review orientation, which will happen soon, because only three of their current active membership participated in the first orientation.

 

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