Not So Far Afield is a bimonthly publication of the Maryknoll Affiliates. The name is a play on the title of the original Maryknoll Magazine: The Field Afar.

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Monday, 18 February 2019 23:02

News from Encuentro and the Border

Written by
David Stocker making drums at Portland Mission Nonviolence.

We received a holiday update from David Stocker who participated in the Affiliates Mission Nonviolence Conference in Oregon this fall and shared “The Art of Nonviolence” in the Nov/Dec NSFA. He tells us:

I visited Rivera Sun (another speaker at Mission Nonviolence) in Taos after the Encuentro. We shared stories, and she is a great voice for the Insurrection.

On December 11th, one of our organizers in Tucson—Alejandra, a powerful advocate for immigrants’ rights and a woman who led part of the protest at Eloy Detention Center—was ordered to be deported. We are sure her activism has made her a target of ICE. What to do if all vulnerable people are silenced?

David also thanks readers of the NSFA for their donations to the SOA Watch Puppetistas:

With your support, Puppetistas were able to present the drum making workshop in two community centers in Mexico and at three locations in the US. Our music, arts, and drums were present at the Eloy protest and at the trial in Tucson of the border guard who killed a Mexican teen six years ago.  Many of the children and their parents from the Mexican schools attended our Sunday gathering where the kids were featured in song and dance.

This is groundbreaking for SOAW and I’m proud that we were a part…. Through it all kids are still kids. In this world there can be no ‘others’ because all of the children belong to all of us. It really does take a village…. Thanks.

 

Monday, 18 February 2019 22:56

Compassion and Hospitality on the Border

Written by

Compassion and Hospitality on the Border

Jerrie Drinkwine – Seattle Chapter

News flashes of a caravan of people from Central America moving through Mexico to seek asylum in the US filled television screens and social media throughout 2018. Scenes of children being separated from parents horrified most Americans. With these haunting reports, a team of five people from Holy Family Parish, Kirkland, WA, decided to go to the Texas/Mexico border in McAllen, to volunteer at the Humanitarian Respite Center in support of these asylum seekers and to gain information for a possible Adult Mission Trip in February 2019.

Al Drinkwine, left, and Karen and Mark Smith make sandwiches.

What happens after a family is processed by the Border Patrol and US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and enters the Respite Center mirrors the social teachings of Jesus. Families come off prison buses from ICE with one adult per family having a tracking device secured to one ankle. All shoe laces and belts have been removed by ICE to prevent potential suicide. Once in the Respite Center, they are welcomed warmly by a team of volunteers and four paid staff members. This is where the hospitality and compassion take place.

Monday, 18 February 2019 22:53

REFUGEES

Written by

 Brian Bilston

They have no need of our help
So do not tell me
These haggard faces could belong to you or me
Should life have dealt a different hand
We need to see them for who they really are
Chancers and scroungers
Layabouts and loungers
With bombs up their sleeves
Cut-throats and thieves
They are not
Welcome here
We should make them
Go back to where they came from
They cannot
Share our food
Share our homes
Share our countries
Instead let us
Build a wall to keep them out
It is not okay to say
These are people just like us
A place should only belong to those who are born there
Do not be so stupid to think that
The world can be looked at another way

(now read from bottom to top)

 

Reprinted with permission.
Monday, 18 February 2019 22:51

Old Monastic Benediction

Written by

Rev. Eugenia Gamble, pastor of Nipomo Community Presbyterrian Church, Nipomo, CA, adapted this prayer from an old monastic blessing. She closes the organizational meetings for a newly forming local interfaith coalition on immigration with it.

May God bless you with discomfort with easy answers, half-truths, and superficial relationships, so that you will live deeply and from the heart.

May God bless you with anger at injustice, oppression, and the exploitation of people, so that you will work for justice, freedom, and peace.

May God bless you with tears to shed for those that mourn, so that you will reach out your hand to them and turn their mourning into joy.

And may God bless you with just enough foolishness to believe that you can make a difference in the world, so that you will do those things that others say cannot be done. 

Amen.

 

Monday, 18 February 2019 22:46

Potluck Recipe Exchange

Written by

Recipe:  Bean & Tomato Stew—Square Edge

 Shared by: Paula Schaffner – California Central Coast Chapter

For eight months in 1986, the David Schaffner family experienced life in Palmerston North, New Zealand, through a sabbatical exchange. One treat was having lunch at the vegetarian restaurant in the Square Edge Building—so named because it sits on the edge of the city center square.

Living in New Zealand gave us a taste for crossing borders, and bringing home some Kiwi recipes has helped keep alive memories of our life there. Now I make this bean stew occasionally for our at-home dinners or as an easy make-ahead dish for potlucks.

*****

Bean & Tomato Stew – Square Edge

Contributed by Paula Schaffner

(Adapted from a recipe we enjoyed at the Square Edge Cafe, a great vegetarian café in Palmerston North, New Zealand.
The Square Edge Café shared its favorite recipes in a booklet.)

 Put the ingredients into a crockpot (or large casserole dish) in the following order:

            ¼ Cup      Oil

            ½ Cup      Onions, sliced

                    2      Carrots, chopped in large chunks      

                    3      Celery stalks, sliced

             1 Cup      Mushrooms

              2 tsp.      Salt

              2 tsp.      Garlic powder

              1 tsp.      Thyme (or dried basil)

              2 tsp.      Paprika

    1 16 oz. can      Garbanzo beans

    1 16 oz. can      Great White Northern beans

    1 16 oz. can      Pinto beans

             1 Cup      Tomato puree (or 1 16 oz. can diced tomatoes, blended)

            ½ Cup      Sugar

            ¼ Cup      Red wine

                    2      Bay leaves

Cover and simmer in crockpot (or low oven) for 4 hours.

*****

Your turn: Please send your favorite potluck recipe, particularly one that promotes global awareness, to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Did you first eat this dish in a cross-cultural setting? Have you served it to foreign visitors? Tell us about it!

 

 

Monday, 18 February 2019 22:42

Seeking Peace in Peru

Written by

Carlos Apcho – Affiliate, Lima, Peru 

For the sixth consecutive year, we carried out the March of Nonviolence on October 2. Marchers included the Lima, Peru, Chapter of Maryknoll Affiliates, lay people of the parish, area residents and college students, Father Jose Fedora, MM, Maryknoll Sisters Rosemary McCormack and Analyn Manauis, and the Ambassador from India in Peru.

This march celebrates the birth of Mahatma Gandhi, the Father of India’s Independence, and renews our commitment to follow in his footsteps. Historically, Gandhi’s actions demonstrated that pacifism was a valid instrument for achieving political objectives. Gandhi maintained his struggle through peaceful resistance and seeking concord, and gained India’s  independence without bloodshed, in a century convulsed by two world wars and a number of tragic events.

During the March of Nonviolence, we are sensitized against using violence toward children, men, women, animals, or Mother Earth, and we are reminded that peace should lead us to love each other, no matter what religious creed each person practices. We pray to God that with the passage of time the March will take us to take us further along the path of nonviolence where we create an atmosphere of respect and harmony between the population to the south of Lima and Mother Earth.

*Translated from “Marcha por la No Violencia en Perú,” in No Tan Lejos del Horizonte #35, Nov-Dec 2018.
Monday, 18 February 2019 22:39

The Trip to Nada

Written by

Bob Short - New England Chapter, Executive Coordinator

On Friday noon, after four and a half days of restoring a house with the Houston Chapter Mission project, two of the facilitators, Bob & Ruth Kleeman, took the Affiliate mission members on a trip to give us a taste of rural Texas.  We hopped into three cars and headed out on a two-hour ride across the vast, flat landscape of southeastern Texas to a little town called Nada. 

For those with even a cursory knowledge of Spanish, “Nada” initially seemed like a perfectly fitting name. The town-folk we spoke with estimated that there were a little over 300 people in town. However, the last available census in 2000 counted only 165. The discrepancy is probably attributable to genuine local pride.  Reportedly, Nada boasts a grocery store and US Post Office.  All any of us could see that day along Highway 71, which cuts through the center of town, were an auto garage and Leo’s Place, a bar and restaurant.  Checking on Facebook for “Things to do in Nada, TX” brings up a photo of an open crop field with a John Deere combine and a truck in the distance. No other photos or text appear on the page.

Monday, 18 February 2019 22:28

What a Few Affiliates Can Do

Written by

Ron Covey – Houston Chapter

Have you ever wondered, as I do, what caused the miracle of Caminando Por La Paz to continue? In the nearly ten years since Father Tom Goekler's death, we at Caminando have received an unbelievable amount of support from our fellow Affiliates. We believe that God has used the Affiliates to continue the miracle of Caminando.

After a nutritious meal, the students enjoy the tutoring session.

When I first became involved with the Caminando Por La Paz Catholic Worker House, the Catholic Worker House in New Haven, CT, sent us some money for our educational efforts. I was not sure how I could communicate sufficiently with the folks at Caminando, so I arranged a meeting with the Affiliates of the Guatemala Chapter. That Guatemala Chapter continues to be in strong solidarity with us, giving encouragement to us and all our activities. Rosa Beatriz (Guatemala chapter and Affiliate Board member) says, “Our meetings make us feel as one community.” She also says it is such a joy to see our red truck coming with the people from “Zone 18,” as they refer to us from Caminando.

Monday, 18 February 2019 22:25

Kenyan Affiliate Chapter Welcomed

Written by

An exciting exploration of new ways to be Affiliates is blossoming in Kenya. Fourteen prospective Affiliates from Mombasa, Nairobi, California, Chicago, Florida, and Germany have been coming together for formation, discussion and prayer, in person and virtually, since 2017. Interfaith collaboration is a guiding principle of their chapter. Members include Catholic and non-Catholic Christians and a Muslim. The chapter has a strong interaction with various Maryknollers. The Affiliate Board accepted their application in January. We look to learn much from this new chapter.

Monday, 18 February 2019 22:19

News from the Board: Meet Ted Miles

Written by

As Executive Director for Maryknoll Lay Missioners since December 2017, I also serve on the Maryknoll Affiliate Board as its liaison with the Maryknoll Lay Missioners. In this position, I am discovering ways that all Maryknollers can work together in mission.

My mission background started when I was “ruined for life” with a little help from the Jesuits.  After my B.A. at Loyola University, Maryland, and M.A. from Bucknell University, I volunteered with Jesuit Volunteers for two years in education and youth empowerment programs in Belize and Guatemala.

Since then, I have served in parish ministry, Catholic high school education, and archdiocesan leadership development for more than three decades. My most recent position was as Catholic Relief Services’ Relationship Manager for Youth and Education and coordinator of the agency’s youth outreach in the US. I’m humbled that the National Federation for Catholic Youth Ministry awarded me a national award for leadership in youth ministry in the area of gospel values of peace and justice.

Fun Facts:  My favorite pastimes include time with my niece and two nephews, following the Baltimore Orioles, and swimming, camping, and hiking, the latter fueling my passion to work for climate justice.  

 

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