Not So Far Afield is a bimonthly publication of the Maryknoll Affiliates. The name is a play on the title of the original Maryknoll Magazine: The Field Afar.

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Saturday, 31 December 2016 17:27

Affiliate Retreat at Watch Hill

Written by

Bob Short – Executive Coordinator

Some retreat attendees: L to R, Top row: Mark Morrison, Joan Crowley
Row 2: Ann Braudis, MM (presenter), Mary Ford (MEF), Jane Dubois, Kathy Morrison
Row 3: Myra Green; Front row: Bill Wheeler, Bill Murphy, James Comes, Monique Cerundolo

The Greater Boston Affiliate Chapter held their annual retreat in mid-November at the Maryknoll Sisters’ retreat/vacation house in Watch Hill, RI.  The retreat followed the 2016 election by only a few days, and the 14 Affiliate participants from five New England states arrived feeling rattled, despondent and holding emotions not felt in a long time.  Thankfully, retreats, if they are good, have a way of opening our minds and souls to deeper, more hope-filled realities.  This retreat surely did that.  What’s more, the physical setting, with expansive views of the Atlantic Ocean accessible from many vantage points within the spacious house; and, outside, a leaf covered pathway that led one to that ocean shore in just minutes, politely colluded to usher in a sense of, “It’ll all be ok.”  

Saturday, 31 December 2016 17:20

Claudia Samayoa Speaks 

Written by

 Translated and condensed from No Tan Lejos del Horizonte Special Edition, November 2016.

On November 3, 2016, Claudia Samayoa, a Maryknoll Affiliate of the Guatemala Chapter, received the Myrna Mack Chang Order from Human Rights Ombudsman Jorge De León Duque on November 3, 2016. He established the Order in 2014 to honor Myrna Mack Chang, a Guatemalan anthropologist murdered by Guatemalan military forces for her investigative work and commitment to the population displaced by the Internal Armed Conflict in Guatemala.

Recognizing Claudia as an activist who raises her voice to defend the human rights of Guatemalans, Duque praised Claudia’s concern for her fellow man and her placing her academic training at the service of the cause of human rights. He said, “Today is an auspicious day to deliver this recognition because attacks on human rights defenders have increased. And today there is also an inappropriate use of criminal law to imprison defenders. Being a human rights advocate is a high-risk job.”

Human rights have always been part of my being. I had a problem with the dogma that only Christians are saved; If God created us all equal in dignity, we should all be recognized as equal and respected. I did not accept the terrible reality in which I grew up: the exiles of my parents’ friends, the murders of doctors known to my father, images of massacres collected in Amnesty International magazines and surreptitiously shared with my father by the priest of Chimaltenango. 

Saturday, 31 December 2016 15:17

Nonviolence 2017

Written by

Nonviolence is the theme of Pope Francis’s Peace Message.

Pope Francis recognized the 50th annual World Peace Day, January 1, by sending us the first Catholic document on nonviolence, entitled: Nonviolence: a Style of Politics for Peace.  

Francis’s concise and readable seven-page message has sections on:

  • A broken world: Violence is not the cure for our broken world.
  • More powerful than violence: Nonviolence is sometimes taken to mean surrender, lack of involvement and passivity, but this is not the case.
  • The domestic roots of a politics of nonviolence: ...it is fundamental that nonviolence be practised before all else within families.
  • My invitation: Peacebuilding through active nonviolence is the natural and necessary complement to the Church’s continuing efforts to limit the use of force…

Find Pope Francis’s document on nonviolence at Vatican.va or with additional resources at usccb.org/issues-and-action/human-life-and-dignity/war-and-peace/world-day-of-peace.cfm .

Saturday, 31 December 2016 15:09

Days of Infamy: 75th Anniversary

Written by

More than 120,000 people of Japanese descent were infamously rounded up and sent to Internment Centers in various western states, by Executive Order from the President, February 19, 1942, 75 years ago. 

Japanese citizens were forcibly taken to detention camps in 1942.

Immediately after Pearl Harbor, Seattle’s Japanese community found a staunch supporter in Bishop Gerald Shaughnessy. In a pastoral letter read in every church in the diocese on December 14, 1941, the bishop called for a whole-hearted support of the war effort—and of people of Japanese descent: “Our Catholic heritage especially inculcates upon us in these momentous hours that we embrace our fellow American citizens of Japanese extraction in a special bond of charity.” (See www.stjames-cathedral.org/history/holythings/18maryknoll.aspx ) 

Saturday, 31 December 2016 14:53

Learning about Immigration and Refugees

Written by
Marie Wren discusses immigration with Manny Hotchkiss,
our newest Maryknoll Affiliate Board member.

Marie Wren, of The San Francisco /North Bay Chapter, shared that in past years their chapter has organized presentations at the parish where they meet. These included a three-part series on Catholic social teaching, and a “Meet Maryknoll” evening. Other parishes in the diocese and schools and colleges were invited. 

For 2017, the chapter members are educating themselves regarding immigration and refugees, and they are planning an evening presentation on these topics with the hope that the parish may sponsor a refugee family. 

Saturday, 31 December 2016 07:10

Virtual Coincidence

Written by

The Maryknoll Affiliate Board has been investigating and has approved having virtual chapters. Some Affiliates, like Kris Neufeld (see her article, "Table Talk,"), have moved away from their original chapter and have not found a similar community in their new homes. Other folks, strong Maryknoll and social justice supporters, may not have a chapter in their geographic area. Virtual chapters could help unite them to each other and to other Affiliate Chapters. 

 Since the first virtual chapter attempts will be considered pilot projects, there is still a great deal of flexibility. Contact Bob Short at rshort@maryknollaffiliates if you have ideas, want to be involved, or to get more information.

Saturday, 31 December 2016 06:55

Table Talk

Written by

Kris Neufeld – NSFA Staff Editor

One of my favorite books is Kitchen Table Wisdom, by Rachel Naomi Remen, a medical doctor who, as she puts it, listens to people’s stories. She writes, “Everybody is a story. When I was a child, people sat around kitchen tables and told their stories. We don’t do that so much anymore. Sitting around the table telling stories is not just a way of passing time. It is the way the wisdom gets passed along. The stuff that helps us to live a life worth remembering… Real stories take time. We stopped telling stories when we started to lose that sort of time, pausing time, reflecting time, wondering time.”

I am now in a new life phase. In the last three years, I have moved that many times, including a frustrating eight months in a furnished house which was intended to be a 2-3-month stop between selling my house and moving back to Minnesota. I sat on furniture and slept in a bed that weren’t mine, surrounded by cardboard boxes that contained the familiar things of my past life. What had been intended as a short-term fix turned into an isolating, frustrating year.

Now I live in what will likely be my last home—a small rental cottage in a senior community in Rochester, NY. It is a city where I know a few people and where I hope to be able to pay the rent if I happen to live as long as my ancestors. However, it is an additional two hours away from old friends in the New Jersey Affiliate Chapter, whom I have tried to see once a year for the last 15 years, and six to seven hours away from happenings at Maryknoll.

So, in many ways it feels like my “telling-stories-time” is on the back burner, but not because I don’t have the “pausing time, the reflecting time, the wondering time” of which Remen writes. The task now is to seek like-minded people who are willing to sit around kitchen tables to tell me their stories and to listen to mine.

It is difficult, as one grows older, to make new relationships, and yet it is necessary, given the steady loss and erosion of long-time friends whose stories I knew so well and whose lives had intersected with mine for so many years.

These are some of my musings when I read in NSFA that Affiliates have been discussing a book they have read in common. I must confess this doesn’t hold much appeal for me. A virtual community, however, could be another matter—a sharing with others of my clumsy attempts to integrate into a new space and a new and confusing city, and of my attempts to be of service to others in a new way. I might like to tell them about my four Syrian women refugees who speak only enough English to respond to “What is your name?” (How I hope, someday, to listen to their stories!) And I’d like to hear others’ stories about how they continue to find ways to feel, and be, relevant—not just as a person but particularly as an older Affiliate.

See the next article: Virtual Coincidence.

Saturday, 31 December 2016 06:42

Seattle Chapter: Working Together

Written by

In Seattle, Fr. Tom Marti, MM, and Anna Clarke Johnson,
Team Leader for the Western Region,
Maryknoll US Mission Education

Connections. The Seattle Chapter makes a point of maintaining contacts with missioners in the field and contributing to mission efforts. Ralph Maughan (Western Region Co-coordinator) will be connecting with Br. Tim Raible, MM, and Br. John Beeching, MM, in Bangkok, Thailand, in early 2017. For many years, Br. Tim was assigned to mission promotion from the Seattle Maryknoll House, where the Seattle Chapter meets. 

Saturday, 31 December 2016 06:35

Connecting in Claremont

Written by
Enjoying sunshine, good food, and companionship are attendees, l to r: Kathee Bautista, Paula Schaffner, Jean and Hugh Minton, David Schaffner, and Richard Perez.

On their way to visit family, Affiliate Board Chair David Schaffner and his wife, NSFA co-editor Paula, enjoyed a newsy lunch with California Regional Coordinators Hugh and Jean Menton and other Los Angeles Chapter Affiliates. Kathee Bautista is working on a human trafficking project, and Richard Perez talked of his long-time ties to Maryknoll. 

The Sierra Club has revived its midwinter, midnight walk among the homeless of Skid Row, and many LA Chapter members plan to join them. As a new member of the Los Angeles Chapter, Jean Minton had written  about the walk in the March/April 2013 NSFA article, “LA – Sierra Club Skid Row Walk,”  p. 5. 

Saturday, 31 December 2016 06:29

Living in Bubbles

Written by

Kitty Schiltz – Seattle Chapter

A review of Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right, by Arlie Russell Hochschild, The New Press, New York, 2016.

For the last five years, Arlie Russell Hochschild, a sociology professor from Berkeley, listened to, observed, and became friends with the people in the Louisiana bayou—Tea Party country. Her sociological study provides insight into the almost inevitable election of Trump. In her words, the political climate was “like a pile of dry kindling waiting for a spark to ignite it.” Hochschild’s stories flesh out her exhaustive study of the Louisiana bayou people who live in a very petrochemically polluted, poverty-riddled area.

We may feel really good living in our little isolated bubble. But there are many bubbles, large and small. How big is our family? We feel good when we are within our bubble, but Professor Hochschild’s study asks us to go outside our comfort bubble and be with others.

Strangers in Our Own Land speaks to a missioner’s approach when entering another culture. Quoting Max Warren, of The Church of Ireland Missionary Society, “Our first task in approaching another culture, another religion, is to take off our shoes, for the place we are approaching is holy. Else we may find ourselves treading on other peoples dreams. More serious still, we may forget that God was here before our arrival.” 

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